Response to the Letter to the Editor from Chermak, Iliadou, Bamiou, and Musiek (2018) Regarding Vermiglio (2018), “The Gold Standard and Auditory Processing Disorder” Purpose This is a response to a letter to the editor from Drs. Chermak, Iliadou, Bamiou, and Musiek regarding “The Gold Standard and Auditory Processing Disorder” (Vermiglio, 2018). Chermak et al. have taken issue with several of the concepts presented in this article. This response addresses their key criticisms ... Article
Article  |   October 29, 2018
Response to the Letter to the Editor from Chermak, Iliadou, Bamiou, and Musiek (2018) Regarding Vermiglio (2018), “The Gold Standard and Auditory Processing Disorder”
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew J. Vermiglio
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Andrew J. Vermiglio has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Andrew J. Vermiglio has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Andrew J. Vermiglio has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Andrew J. Vermiglio has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Part 2
Article   |   October 29, 2018
Response to the Letter to the Editor from Chermak, Iliadou, Bamiou, and Musiek (2018) Regarding Vermiglio (2018), “The Gold Standard and Auditory Processing Disorder”
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2018, Vol. 3, 83-90. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG6.83
History: Received August 1, 2018 , Revised August 1, 2018 , Accepted September 4, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2018, Vol. 3, 83-90. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG6.83
History: Received August 1, 2018; Revised August 1, 2018; Accepted September 4, 2018

Purpose This is a response to a letter to the editor from Drs. Chermak, Iliadou, Bamiou, and Musiek regarding “The Gold Standard and Auditory Processing Disorder” (Vermiglio, 2018). Chermak et al. have taken issue with several of the concepts presented in this article. This response addresses their key criticisms and expands the discussion on the poor understanding of diagnostic accuracy research in the area of auditory processing disorder (APD).

Conclusions The concept of the diagnostic system provides clarity for critical reviews of the diagnostic accuracy literature on APD. The lack of clarity in the APD construct is fueled by the ambiguity of the definitions. The “evidence” for an APD, irrespective of the presence of a lesion of the central auditory system, is derived through the logical fallacy of equivocation. A recommended alternative approach is to identify legitimate clinical entities within the APD construct, which will lead to the procurement of reasonable gold or reference standards for diagnostic accuracy research.

Acknowledgments
The author gratefully acknowledges the valuable comments from Brenda Vermiglio on all drafts of this article and the generous assistance of Carrie Forbes and the Laupus Health Science Library staff at East Carolina University.
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