Wireless Connectivity in Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants Purpose This article describes several of the issues to be considered when recommending wireless connectivity for hearing aids and cochlear implants. These issues include consideration of appropriate aided/processor audibility—a decision matrix for the type of wireless technology appropriate for each patient and suggestions where each type of wireless ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2018
Wireless Connectivity in Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ron Leavitt
    Corvallis Hearing Center, Corvallis, OR
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Ron Leavitt has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Ron Leavitt has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Ron Leavitt has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Ron Leavitt has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Part 1
Article   |   October 01, 2018
Wireless Connectivity in Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2018, Vol. 3, 24-35. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG7.24
History: Received March 17, 2018 , Revised July 10, 2018 , Accepted August 2, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2018, Vol. 3, 24-35. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG7.24
History: Received March 17, 2018; Revised July 10, 2018; Accepted August 2, 2018

Purpose This article describes several of the issues to be considered when recommending wireless connectivity for hearing aids and cochlear implants. These issues include consideration of appropriate aided/processor audibility—a decision matrix for the type of wireless technology appropriate for each patient and suggestions where each type of wireless technology might be most appropriate. Emphasis is placed on use of objectively verifiable data to show favorable outcome with all technology provided by the audiologist.

Conclusions Research continues to show that hearing aids fit by manufacturers' 1st fit underperform, practically in the high frequencies. Such underperformance not only compromises speech understanding with the hearing aid/processor but also affects the performance of all wireless technology, as such wireless technology relies on the default hearing aid/processor program for its amplification characteristics. In this era of federally approved self-diagnosis and self-treatment of hearing loss/balance disorders, it behooves the audiologist to have objective data showing favorable outcomes for all rehabilitative professional services.

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