A Mixed-Methods Observational Pilot Study of Student Clinicians Who Stutter Purpose The purpose of this observational mixed-methods pilot investigation was to examine how 2 student clinicians who stutter (SCS), doing clinical practicum placements at intensive stuttering clinics, believe stuttering might impact their personal and professional lived experiences. Method Two adult female students who stutter serving ... Article
Article  |   September 25, 2018
A Mixed-Methods Observational Pilot Study of Student Clinicians Who Stutter
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Hudock
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID
  • Chad Yates
    Department of Counseling, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID
  • Linwood G. Vereen
    Department of Counseling and College Student Personnel, Shippensburg University, Shippensburg, PA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Daniel Hudock has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Chad Yates has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Linwood G. Vereen has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Daniel Hudock has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Chad Yates has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Linwood G. Vereen has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Daniel Hudock was involved with the Successful Management Stuttering Program on five different occasions and is the founding director of the Northwest Center for Fluency Disorders at Idaho State University. Chad Yates is the mental health director of the Northwest Center for Fluency Disorders. Linwood G. Vereen has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Daniel Hudock was involved with the Successful Management Stuttering Program on five different occasions and is the founding director of the Northwest Center for Fluency Disorders at Idaho State University. Chad Yates is the mental health director of the Northwest Center for Fluency Disorders. Linwood G. Vereen has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Part 1
Article   |   September 25, 2018
A Mixed-Methods Observational Pilot Study of Student Clinicians Who Stutter
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2018, Vol. 3, 30-57. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG4.30
History: Received September 28, 2017 , Revised May 24, 2018 , Accepted August 23, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2018, Vol. 3, 30-57. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG4.30
History: Received September 28, 2017; Revised May 24, 2018; Accepted August 23, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this observational mixed-methods pilot investigation was to examine how 2 student clinicians who stutter (SCS), doing clinical practicum placements at intensive stuttering clinics, believe stuttering might impact their personal and professional lived experiences.

Method Two adult female students who stutter serving as clinicians at 2 separate intensive stuttering clinics completed pre and post self-reported clinic assessments of stuttering and were interviewed near the beginning, in the middle, at the end of their respective clinics and during a member-checking interview several weeks after the clinics had ended.

Results Generic qualitative analysis revealed the 3 following themes: (a) early experiences with stuttering, (b) shifts toward acceptance of stuttering, and (c) experiences as SCS. Participants' changes in quantitative data support the themes and revealed substantial decreases in negative impact from stuttering from before to after the clinics.

Conclusion Participants initially reported negative experiences with stuttering and doubting their abilities to become speech-language pathologists; however, during their clinical experiences, they transitioned to preferring openness and acceptance of their stuttering and began viewing it as a personal and professional strength. Recommendations for how instructors and clinical supervisors can help support SCS are described within.

Acknowledgments
We would like to acknowledge Jody O'Donnell for her contributions to the Northwest Center for Fluency Disorders Interprofessional Intensive Stuttering Clinic, clients, students, colleagues, and friends whom she positively impacted during her many years as a speech-language pathologist in Idaho and a clinical faculty member of Idaho State University. Your clinical perspective and experience have helped improve our understanding in this area. You are, and will continue to be, missed.
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