A Framework for Curriculum-Based Language Evaluations Purpose Epidemiological research has indicated that students with language-based disorders are underidentified (Tomblin et al., 2007). Research has indicated that speech-language pathologists working in the schools utilize tests based on the year of publication rather than the tests' diagnostic accuracy (Betz, Eickhoff, & Sullivan, 2013). To further amplify these ... Article
Article  |   September 17, 2018
A Framework for Curriculum-Based Language Evaluations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jayne Brandel
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV
  • Douglas B. Petersen
    David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Jayne Brandel has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Douglas B. Petersen is a coauthor of the CUBED assessment.
    Financial: Jayne Brandel has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Douglas B. Petersen is a coauthor of the CUBED assessment.×
  • Nonfinancial: Jayne Brandel has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Douglas B. Petersen has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Jayne Brandel has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Douglas B. Petersen has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Part 3
Article   |   September 17, 2018
A Framework for Curriculum-Based Language Evaluations
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2018, Vol. 3, 67-87. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG16.67
History: Received April 10, 2018 , Revised June 29, 2018 , Accepted July 5, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2018, Vol. 3, 67-87. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG16.67
History: Received April 10, 2018; Revised June 29, 2018; Accepted July 5, 2018

Purpose Epidemiological research has indicated that students with language-based disorders are underidentified (Tomblin et al., 2007). Research has indicated that speech-language pathologists working in the schools utilize tests based on the year of publication rather than the tests' diagnostic accuracy (Betz, Eickhoff, & Sullivan, 2013). To further amplify these problems, the adoption of new curriculum standards (e.g., Common Core State Standards) by many states has raised the academic expectations for students and increased the likelihood for students with language-based disorders to struggle to perform similarly to their peers in school. The impact of a potential language-based disorder should be established based on the interaction between the student's language abilities and his or her academic performance or participation within the academic setting.

Conclusions Given the complexity of academic language and the need to make determinations of eligibility related to a student's ability to attain academic success (Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, 2004), practitioners are provided the opportunity to reexamine the current process for conducting evaluations that are aligned with curricular demands. The current article provides a framework for completing evaluations in the school setting that are anchored in both oral and written academic language, that actively engage team members, and that provide the speech-language pathologist the ability to integrate multiple sources of information in a systematic manner in order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the student's oral and written language abilities within the context of the academic environment.

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