Preliminary Investigation of the Use of Phonological Awareness Paired With Production Training in Childhood Apraxia of Speech Purpose Although childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is generally considered a motor speech disorder, there is evidence implicating deficits in speech perception as a causative factor. If this is the case, alternative treatment approaches that address both the production and perceptual deficits may result in better outcomes. The ... Article
Article  |   September 05, 2018
Preliminary Investigation of the Use of Phonological Awareness Paired With Production Training in Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sue B. Hume
    Department of Audiology & Speech Pathology, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN
  • Ilsa Schwarz
    Department of Audiology & Speech Pathology, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN
  • Mark Hedrick
    Department of Audiology & Speech Pathology, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Sue B. Hume has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Ilsa Schwarz has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Mark Hedrick has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Sue B. Hume has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Ilsa Schwarz has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Mark Hedrick has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Sue B. Hume has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Ilsa Schwarz has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Mark Hedrick has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Sue B. Hume has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Ilsa Schwarz has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Mark Hedrick has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 2
Article   |   September 05, 2018
Preliminary Investigation of the Use of Phonological Awareness Paired With Production Training in Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2018, Vol. 3, 38-52. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG16.38
History: Received March 28, 2018 , Revised March 28, 2018 , Accepted June 5, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2018, Vol. 3, 38-52. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG16.38
History: Received March 28, 2018; Revised March 28, 2018; Accepted June 5, 2018

Purpose Although childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is generally considered a motor speech disorder, there is evidence implicating deficits in speech perception as a causative factor. If this is the case, alternative treatment approaches that address both the production and perceptual deficits may result in better outcomes. The current study was conducted to explore the effectiveness of integrating speech production training and phonological awareness for the treatment of CAS.

Method Six children aged 4;9–7;3 years;months and diagnosed with CAS participated in individual treatment programs conducted over 30 sessions. During each session, traditional articulation treatment of each child's speech production targets was combined with phonological awareness operations of rhyme, sound identification, blending, segmentation, manipulation, and letter–sound identification.

Results Comparison of preintervention and postintervention assessments resulted in significant improvements in the accuracy of phoneme productions and improvement in the consistency of word productions and phonological awareness skills.

Conclusions These results, although preliminary, support previous studies showing that traditional articulation therapy, combined with perceptual training in phonological awareness, may be an effective treatment approach for some children with CAS. However, further investigations using more robust research designs are needed to add to the evidence base in support of this type of treatment as a viable approach in the treatment of CAS.

Acknowledgments
The authors are grateful to The University of Tennessee Health Science Center for their support of this project and to the participants and their families.
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