“What Have You Been Doing?”: Supporting Displaced Talk Through Augmentative and Alternative Communication Video Visual Scene Display Technology Purpose Displaced talk, or talk about past or future events, is a common form of interaction for social closeness. Some school-age children with autism spectrum disorder are restricted in their use of displaced talk and, in turn, are restricted in their participation in social interaction. The purpose of ... Article
Article  |   August 15, 2018
“What Have You Been Doing?”: Supporting Displaced Talk Through Augmentative and Alternative Communication Video Visual Scene Display Technology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica Caron
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA
  • Christine Holyfield
    Department of Rehabilitation, Human Resources and Communication Disorders, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
  • Janice Light
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA
  • David McNaughton
    Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Jessica Caron has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Christine Holyfield has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Janice Light has no relevant financial interests to disclose. David McNaughton has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Jessica Caron has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Christine Holyfield has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Janice Light has no relevant financial interests to disclose. David McNaughton has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Jessica Caron has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Christine Holyfield has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Janice Light has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. David McNaughton has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Jessica Caron has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Christine Holyfield has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Janice Light has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. David McNaughton has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Part 3
Article   |   August 15, 2018
“What Have You Been Doing?”: Supporting Displaced Talk Through Augmentative and Alternative Communication Video Visual Scene Display Technology
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2018, Vol. 3, 123-135. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG12.123
History: Received February 12, 2018 , Revised May 16, 2018 , Accepted June 5, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2018, Vol. 3, 123-135. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG12.123
History: Received February 12, 2018; Revised May 16, 2018; Accepted June 5, 2018

Purpose Displaced talk, or talk about past or future events, is a common form of interaction for social closeness. Some school-age children with autism spectrum disorder are restricted in their use of displaced talk and, in turn, are restricted in their participation in social interaction. The purpose of the study was to preliminarily explore the use of an augmentative and alternative communication app with video embedded with visual scene displays (VSDs) to support participation in displaced talk surrounding the common question, “What have you been doing?”

Method The study utilized an AB single-case design.

Results The preliminary nature of the study did not allow for a conclusive causal finding, but the findings provided initial insight into the potential utility of the video VSD technology to support participation in displaced talk for an individual with autism spectrum disorder. At baseline, the participant seldom engaged in the communicative interactions; once the video VSD technology was introduced during intervention, he took significantly more communication turns and was more engaged during the sharing interactions.

Conclusions More research is warranted to rigorously explore the efficacy of augmentative and alternative communication technology featuring videos with embedded VSDs as a communication support. The technology shows promise as a support for social interaction, particularly interaction involving displaced talk about past experiences.

Acknowledgments
The contents of this article were developed under a grant awarded to Dr. Light from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR Grant 90RE5017). NIDILRR is a center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services. The contents of this article/poster do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, Administration for Community Living, and Department of Health and Human Services, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. The authors would like to offer their gratitude and thanks to the participant in the study, the graduate students who assisted on the project (Ethan Richtsmeier and Amanda Slowey), and InvoTek for the realization of the software features for evaluation.
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