Cognition and Hearing Aids: What Should Clinicians Know? Purpose Cognitive ability is a multifaceted construct that includes attention, memory, reasoning, problem solving, and decision making. Cognitive ability (and the changes in cognitive ability that occur with age) can impact communication. Recent research has indicated a relationship between uncorrected hearing loss and an increased risk of dementia. Other ... Article
Article  |   August 14, 2018
Cognition and Hearing Aids: What Should Clinicians Know?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pamela E. Souza
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Knowles Hearing Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Pamela E. Souza has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Pamela E. Souza has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Pamela E. Souza has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Pamela E. Souza has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Part 2
Article   |   August 14, 2018
Cognition and Hearing Aids: What Should Clinicians Know?
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2018, Vol. 3, 43-50. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG6.43
History: Received April 17, 2018 , Revised April 17, 2018 , Accepted June 29, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2018, Vol. 3, 43-50. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG6.43
History: Received April 17, 2018; Revised April 17, 2018; Accepted June 29, 2018

Purpose Cognitive ability is a multifaceted construct that includes attention, memory, reasoning, problem solving, and decision making. Cognitive ability (and the changes in cognitive ability that occur with age) can impact communication. Recent research has indicated a relationship between uncorrected hearing loss and an increased risk of dementia. Other studies have suggested that individual cognitive ability may affect the benefits received from specific signal processing strategies. In view of these issues, researchers, field leaders and professional associations, and even our patients have spoken for a greater consideration of cognitive ability in audiology practice. The purpose of this article is to review recent research on hearing and cognition, with an emphasis on how this relationship may influence audiology practice.

Acknowledgments
Some of the work discussed here was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R01 DC0012289. The author is grateful to Jing Shen, Sarah Black, Fernanda Heitor, Kathryn Arehart, and Angela Roberts for many discussions on these topics and to Dan King and the audiology team at Duke Medical Center for helping place the ideas in a clinical context.
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