Teaching Evidence-Based Vocabulary Instruction to Undergraduate Clinicians: A Feasibility Study of Recorded Teaching Modules Purpose The objective of this feasibility study was to determine whether or not brief, recorded teaching modules would increase the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for vocabulary instruction by undergraduate student clinicians. Method This study used a single-case, multiple-baseline design across behaviors and was replicated across participants. Ten ... Article
Article  |   August 31, 2018
Teaching Evidence-Based Vocabulary Instruction to Undergraduate Clinicians: A Feasibility Study of Recorded Teaching Modules
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Kelley
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
  • Greta Hull
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
  • Madison Abell
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Elizabeth Kelley has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Greta Hull has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Madison Abell has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Elizabeth Kelley has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Greta Hull has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Madison Abell has no relevant financial interests to disclose. ×
  • Nonfinancial: Elizabeth Kelley has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Greta Hull has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Madison Abell has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Elizabeth Kelley has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Greta Hull has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Madison Abell has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. ×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Part 2
Article   |   August 31, 2018
Teaching Evidence-Based Vocabulary Instruction to Undergraduate Clinicians: A Feasibility Study of Recorded Teaching Modules
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2018, Vol. 3, 45-61. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG10.45
History: Received November 8, 2017 , Revised May 2, 2018 , Accepted May 23, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2018, Vol. 3, 45-61. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG10.45
History: Received November 8, 2017; Revised May 2, 2018; Accepted May 23, 2018

Purpose The objective of this feasibility study was to determine whether or not brief, recorded teaching modules would increase the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for vocabulary instruction by undergraduate student clinicians.

Method This study used a single-case, multiple-baseline design across behaviors and was replicated across participants. Ten undergraduates were asked to watch 3 recorded teaching modules that taught EBPs for vocabulary instruction during shared storybook reading. Outcome measures were derived from lesson plans and videos of shared storybook reading sessions with preschoolers.

Results Engagement with teaching modules was low. Of the expected 30 viewings, participants watched just 14 teaching modules. However, when participants watched the teaching modules, moderate increases in the use of EBPs were frequently observed (9 treatment replications of a possible 14). In particular, participants increased in the selection of appropriate vocabulary targets.

Conclusions Findings provide preliminary information about the feasibility and potential effects of recorded teaching modules on the use of EBPs. Although rates of engagement with the teaching modules were low, participants who watched the modules often incorporated EBPs into shared storybook reading session. Further practice-based research is necessary to design and implement effective approaches to improve the use of EBPs by student clinicians and practicing speech-language pathologists.

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