Let's Do the Twist: Pairing Interdisciplinary Collaborative Teaching, and Hands-On and Service Learning Opportunities, to Spread Awareness of Communication Sciences and Disorders This article describes an interdisciplinary teaching and outreach initiative in which diverse non–communication sciences and disorders (CSD) undergraduate students were immersed in the discipline of CSD because of their collective interest in music. This model incorporated hands-on research and service learning projects, which exposed undergraduates from different educational backgrounds to ... Article
Article  |   July 11, 2018
Let's Do the Twist: Pairing Interdisciplinary Collaborative Teaching, and Hands-On and Service Learning Opportunities, to Spread Awareness of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aurora J. Weaver
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Nancy J. Haak
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Lawrence Molt
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Anne Rankin Cannon
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: This work was partially funded by two science education for new civic engagements and responsibilities (SENCER) Post-Institute Implementation NSF Subawards SSI 2015 and SSI 2016 and intermural funds provided by Auburn University’s College of Liberal Arts.
    Financial: This work was partially funded by two science education for new civic engagements and responsibilities (SENCER) Post-Institute Implementation NSF Subawards SSI 2015 and SSI 2016 and intermural funds provided by Auburn University’s College of Liberal Arts.×
  • Nonfinancial: Aurora J. Weaver has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Nancy J. Haak has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Lawrence Molt has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Anne Rankin Cannon has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Aurora J. Weaver has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Nancy J. Haak has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Lawrence Molt has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Anne Rankin Cannon has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Part 1
Article   |   July 11, 2018
Let's Do the Twist: Pairing Interdisciplinary Collaborative Teaching, and Hands-On and Service Learning Opportunities, to Spread Awareness of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, July 2018, Vol. 3, 27-44. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG10.27
History: Received October 13, 2017 , Revised April 23, 2018 , Accepted May 16, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, July 2018, Vol. 3, 27-44. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG10.27
History: Received October 13, 2017; Revised April 23, 2018; Accepted May 16, 2018

This article describes an interdisciplinary teaching and outreach initiative in which diverse non–communication sciences and disorders (CSD) undergraduate students were immersed in the discipline of CSD because of their collective interest in music. This model incorporated hands-on research and service learning projects, which exposed undergraduates from different educational backgrounds to empirical research in both CSD and the concept of evidence-based practice.

This article reviews the concepts of education models, with focus on service learning and interdisciplinary professional learning communities; in addition, it provides an example of how active learning engages non-CSD majors in scientific processes, evidence-based practice principles, and community engagement activities related to CSD. In addition, the use of the Student Assessment of their Learning Gains system is described as a tool for capturing anonymous self-reported learning gains, which can be used for evaluating the scholarship of teaching and learning and course review. The successes and limitations within the teaching and outreach initiative are discussed, and modifications are suggested to improve implementation of future active learning collaboration opportunities.

Acknowledgments
The work described in this article has been partially funded by three SENCER Post-Institute Implementation NSF Subawards (SSI-2013 [Ann Knipschild], SSI-2015 [Nancy J. Haak], and SSI-2016 [Aurora J. Weaver]) and intermural funds provided by Auburn University's College of Liberal Arts. We thank Paula Bobrowski and Robert Holm for their efforts in connecting the authors with SENCER community, including Eliza Reilly and Steve Carroll. We are appreciative of the community partners (Growing Room Auburn, Arbor Springs Health and Rehab Center, Lamar Woody, BraveHeart: Center for Place and Purpose) that supported the civic engagement project; Justin Moody and Melissa Pangelinan for contributing to their resources, expertise, and time to the research project; Ann Knipschild and Joshua Pifer for allowing the authors into their courses to conduct these projects; and Martha Wilder Wilson for her help preparing this manuscript.
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