Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention in Public Schools: Achieving Meaningful Outcomes Through Collaboration Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interventions in public schools typically involve some level of collaboration between different professionals, including speech-language pathologists, behavior analysts, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and special educators. Together, these team members share a responsibility for developing, implementing, and measuring progress toward cohesive AAC programs. Although most intervention ... Article
Article  |   June 18, 2018
Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention in Public Schools: Achieving Meaningful Outcomes Through Collaboration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather J. Forbes
    Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network Autism Initiative, Harrisburg, PA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Heather J. Forbes has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Heather J. Forbes has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Heather J. Forbes has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Heather J. Forbes has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Part 2
Article   |   June 18, 2018
Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention in Public Schools: Achieving Meaningful Outcomes Through Collaboration
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2018, Vol. 3, 55-69. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG12.55
History: Received November 29, 2017 , Revised November 29, 2017 , Accepted February 1, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2018, Vol. 3, 55-69. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG12.55
History: Received November 29, 2017; Revised November 29, 2017; Accepted February 1, 2018

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interventions in public schools typically involve some level of collaboration between different professionals, including speech-language pathologists, behavior analysts, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and special educators. Together, these team members share a responsibility for developing, implementing, and measuring progress toward cohesive AAC programs. Although most intervention teams aim for learners to achieve meaningful benefits from their programs, it could be challenging to establish these gains in an objective, systematic, and timely manner. Drawing from a conjoint behavioral consultation model, I present a collaborative decision-making framework that can guide public school intervention teams through data-driven program decisions and ensure effective interventions for learners who require AAC.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.