Functional Evaluation and Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Acute Rehabilitation Across rehabilitation settings, speech-language pathology intervention for the rehabilitation of cognitive communication impairment following acquired brain injury begins with evaluation and ideally ends with generalization and carryover of strategies. Throughout rehabilitation, it is important that a clinician incorporate functional goals unique to each patient. Studies have shown that, when customized ... Article
Article  |   May 11, 2018
Functional Evaluation and Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Acute Rehabilitation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin O. Mattingly
    Enterprise Resource Performance Inc., Washington, DC
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Erin O. Mattingly has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Erin O. Mattingly has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Erin O. Mattingly has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Erin O. Mattingly has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Part 1
Article   |   May 11, 2018
Functional Evaluation and Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Acute Rehabilitation
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, May 2018, Vol. 3, 13-20. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG2.13
History: Received August 20, 2017 , Revised December 29, 2017 , Accepted April 3, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, May 2018, Vol. 3, 13-20. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG2.13
History: Received August 20, 2017; Revised December 29, 2017; Accepted April 3, 2018

Across rehabilitation settings, speech-language pathology intervention for the rehabilitation of cognitive communication impairment following acquired brain injury begins with evaluation and ideally ends with generalization and carryover of strategies. Throughout rehabilitation, it is important that a clinician incorporate functional goals unique to each patient. Studies have shown that, when customized treatment tasks are utilized, patients engage in active, effortful processing of information and tasks, leading to improved outcomes (Riley & Heaton, 2000; Riley, Sotiriou, & Jaspal, 2004; Sohlberg & Turkstra, 2011; Stark, Stark, & Gordon, 2005; Zlotowitz et al., 2010). Although clinicians may not always have ready access or the time to read the latest research outlining specific training techniques, utilizing a functional, customizable, nonworkbook approach to cognitive–linguistic rehabilitation will support patient goals and ideally lead to improved generalization of skills. Using the Sohlberg and Turkstra (2011)  model of plan, implement, and evaluate and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as frameworks, this article will demonstrate functional treatment development and implementation across various cognitive–linguistic symptoms in the acute rehabilitation setting. This article directly addresses clinical care techniques while discussing the need for continued research into the areas of functional rehabilitation.

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