“We Saw Our Son Blossom” A Guide for Fostering Culturally Responsive Partnerships to Support African American Autistic Children and Their Families Findings related to racial and ethnic disparities in autism research indicate that there are broad socioeconomic, cultural, and language barriers that limit African American families' navigation of services and supports. Although African American autistic children and their families face challenges in accessing services, speech-language pathologists (SLPs ) are well-positioned to ... Article
Article  |   April 27, 2018
“We Saw Our Son Blossom” A Guide for Fostering Culturally Responsive Partnerships to Support African American Autistic Children and Their Families
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jamie N. Pearson
    Department of Teacher Education and Learning Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
  • Megan-Brette Hamilton
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Hedda Meadan
    Department of Special Education, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Champaign, IL
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Jamie N. Pearson has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Megan-Brette Hamilton has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Hedda Meadan has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Jamie N. Pearson has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Megan-Brette Hamilton has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Hedda Meadan has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Jamie N. Pearson has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Megan-Brette Hamilton has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Hedda Meadan has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Jamie N. Pearson has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Megan-Brette Hamilton has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Hedda Meadan has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Part 2
Article   |   April 27, 2018
“We Saw Our Son Blossom” A Guide for Fostering Culturally Responsive Partnerships to Support African American Autistic Children and Their Families
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2018, Vol. 3, 84-97. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG1.84
History: Received December 8, 2017 , Revised February 27, 2018 , Accepted February 28, 2018
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2018, Vol. 3, 84-97. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG1.84
History: Received December 8, 2017; Revised February 27, 2018; Accepted February 28, 2018

Findings related to racial and ethnic disparities in autism research indicate that there are broad socioeconomic, cultural, and language barriers that limit African American families' navigation of services and supports. Although African American autistic children and their families face challenges in accessing services, speech-language pathologists (SLPs ) are well-positioned to support them through strengthened partnerships. The purpose of this article is to (a) introduce a conceptual model for engaging in culturally responsive partnerships with African American families, (b) discuss the roles and responsibilities of SLPs in addressing the needs of African American autistic children, and (c) provide SLPs with strategies to develop partnerships that are facilitated by cultural reciprocity, collaboration, empowerment, and self-determination.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.