Update on Velopharyngeal Closure in Young Children During early speech development, the velopharyngeal mechanism may play a major role in the rapid expansion of a child's repertoire of speech sounds. Results of a longitudinal study suggest that, during spontaneous speech, velopharyngeal closure is largely complete by the age of 19 months. There is evidence, however, of differences ... Article
Article  |   March 12, 2018
Update on Velopharyngeal Closure in Young Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kate Bunton
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: This work was supported in part by NIH/NIDCD R01 DC010140, R01 NIH R01-DC011275, and NSF BCS-1145011.
    Financial: This work was supported in part by NIH/NIDCD R01 DC010140, R01 NIH R01-DC011275, and NSF BCS-1145011.×
  • Nonfinancial: Portions of this data were previously presented at the 2017 annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
    Nonfinancial: Portions of this data were previously presented at the 2017 annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 1
Article   |   March 12, 2018
Update on Velopharyngeal Closure in Young Children
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2018, Vol. 3, 4-12. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG5.4
History: Received September 8, 2017 , Revised November 22, 2017 , Accepted December 29, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2018, Vol. 3, 4-12. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG5.4
History: Received September 8, 2017; Revised November 22, 2017; Accepted December 29, 2017

During early speech development, the velopharyngeal mechanism may play a major role in the rapid expansion of a child's repertoire of speech sounds. Results of a longitudinal study suggest that, during spontaneous speech, velopharyngeal closure is largely complete by the age of 19 months. There is evidence, however, of differences in the consistency of velopharyngeal closure between sound categories. This finding has implications for early speech assessment and intervention decisions in clinical populations.

Acknowledgment
Work was supported in part by NIH/NIDCD R01 DC010140, R01 NIH R01-DC011275, and NSF BCS-1145011.
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