Muscle Fatigue Physiology Applied to Management of Voice Fatigue Voice fatigue is a common concern for individuals seeking voice care with and without laryngeal pathology. In exercise science, muscle fatigue is attributed to central fatigue, peripheral fatigue, or a combination of the two. From the perspective of speech-language pathologists who care for voice disorders, voice fatigue is generally considered ... Article
Article  |   March 07, 2018
Muscle Fatigue Physiology Applied to Management of Voice Fatigue
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary J. Sandage
    Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Mary J. Sandage has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Mary J. Sandage has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Mary J. Sandage has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Mary J. Sandage has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 1
Article   |   March 07, 2018
Muscle Fatigue Physiology Applied to Management of Voice Fatigue
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2018, Vol. 3, 7-11. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG3.7
History: Received May 19, 2017 , Revised June 15, 2017 , Accepted July 13, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2018, Vol. 3, 7-11. doi:10.1044/persp3.SIG3.7
History: Received May 19, 2017; Revised June 15, 2017; Accepted July 13, 2017

Voice fatigue is a common concern for individuals seeking voice care with and without laryngeal pathology. In exercise science, muscle fatigue is attributed to central fatigue, peripheral fatigue, or a combination of the two. From the perspective of speech-language pathologists who care for voice disorders, voice fatigue is generally considered something to be avoided and little attention has been given to fatigue-resistance training programs. Exercise science training paradigms consider muscle fatigue as something to be managed. Strength and conditioning programs include fatigue-resistance as a critical training component to help avoid injury. Work hardening and return-to-work models for rehabilitation as described in the occupational medicine literature are designed to help bridge the gap between limited work provided in the therapy setting and the functional expectation of the employment setting. After reviewing central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue, the voice fatigue literature will be discussed from this framework. Employment of a return-to-work approach to voice habilitation and rehabilitation will be discussed as a means to train the voice for fatigue resistance.

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