Aging in Place: Baby Boomers and What We Can Learn From Japan Billions of health care dollars go towards caring for older adults. Medicare per-person spending rises steadily with age and doubles between ages 70 and 95 (Neuman, Cubanski, Huang, & Damico, 2015). The baby boomers, born between 1946 and 1965, represent a large wave of older patients entering the United States ... Article
Article  |   December 27, 2017
Aging in Place: Baby Boomers and What We Can Learn From Japan
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susana L. Keller
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Services, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
  • Paula Leslie
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Susana L. Keller and Paula Leslie have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Susana L. Keller and Paula Leslie have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Susana L. Keller and Paula Leslie have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Susana L. Keller and Paula Leslie have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Part 3
Article   |   December 27, 2017
Aging in Place: Baby Boomers and What We Can Learn From Japan
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 53-59. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG15.53
History: Received July 27, 2017 , Accepted August 31, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 53-59. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG15.53
History: Received July 27, 2017; Accepted August 31, 2017

Billions of health care dollars go towards caring for older adults. Medicare per-person spending rises steadily with age and doubles between ages 70 and 95 (Neuman, Cubanski, Huang, & Damico, 2015). The baby boomers, born between 1946 and 1965, represent a large wave of older patients entering the United States health care system today. The boomer demographic is significant for its size and longevity, thereby adding pressure to an already strained health care system.

Of critical importance to the boomers is where they expect to live until they die and how they expect to be cared for. Aging in place has become a common phrase and signals the boomers' overwhelming desire to remain at home until the end (Lai, 2008). According to the United Nations, by 2025 Japan will be the country with the highest proportion of individuals aged 75 or over, followed by Sweden and then Italy (Ogawa & Matsukura, 2007). What can we learn from Japan about graceful aging? This article discusses multiple factors responsible for longevity in Japan, ranging from perceptions of aging to government policy.

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