Auditory Processing After Traumatic Brain Injury Auditory processing involves many diverse aspects of the peripheral and central nervous system. Where “simple” transformation of information ends and “signal processing” begins is difficult to say with any certainty, and the distinction between “automatic” processing and “controlled” processing is an even more philosophical question. For these reasons, the damage ... Article
Article  |   December 21, 2017
Auditory Processing After Traumatic Brain Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Frederick J. Gallun
    VA RR&D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR), VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Frederick J. Gallun is a research investigator at VA RR&D NCRAR. Support for the research was provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (Merit Award C77551) and the National Institutes Health, National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (R01 DC011828 and R01 DC015051).
    Financial: Frederick J. Gallun is a research investigator at VA RR&D NCRAR. Support for the research was provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (Merit Award C77551) and the National Institutes Health, National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (R01 DC011828 and R01 DC015051).×
  • Nonfinancial: Frederick J. Gallun has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Frederick J. Gallun has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Part 4
Article   |   December 21, 2017
Auditory Processing After Traumatic Brain Injury
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 147-151. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.147
History: Received May 12, 2017 , Revised July 21, 2017 , Accepted July 28, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 147-151. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.147
History: Received May 12, 2017; Revised July 21, 2017; Accepted July 28, 2017

Auditory processing involves many diverse aspects of the peripheral and central nervous system. Where “simple” transformation of information ends and “signal processing” begins is difficult to say with any certainty, and the distinction between “automatic” processing and “controlled” processing is an even more philosophical question. For these reasons, the damage that occurs in one portion of the nervous system can have serious implications for many other parts of the system. For this reason, it is essential that clinicians involved in working with patients for whom any portion of the auditory system is at risk need to be in close communication with those who specialize in understanding the other parts of this delicate and interwoven system.

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