Understanding the Communication Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Who Are Deafblind America's population is more diverse than ever before. The prevalence of students who are culturally and/or linguistically diverse (CLD) has been steadily increasing over the past decade. The changes in America's demographics require teachers who provide services to students with deafblindness to have an increased awareness of different cultures and ... Article
Article  |   December 18, 2017
Understanding the Communication Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Who Are Deafblind
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandy K. Bowen
    University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO
  • Silvia M. Correa-Torres
    University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Sandy K. Bowen and Silvia M. Correa-Torres have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Sandy K. Bowen and Silvia M. Correa-Torres have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Sandy K. Bowen and Silvia M. Correa-Torres have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Sandy K. Bowen and Silvia M. Correa-Torres have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Part 3
Article   |   December 18, 2017
Understanding the Communication Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Who Are Deafblind
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 81-88. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG12.81
History: Received April 26, 2017 , Revised August 7, 2017 , Accepted August 7, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 81-88. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG12.81
History: Received April 26, 2017; Revised August 7, 2017; Accepted August 7, 2017

America's population is more diverse than ever before. The prevalence of students who are culturally and/or linguistically diverse (CLD) has been steadily increasing over the past decade. The changes in America's demographics require teachers who provide services to students with deafblindness to have an increased awareness of different cultures and diversity in today's classrooms, particularly regarding communication choices. Children who are deafblind may use spoken language with appropriate amplification, sign language or modified sign language, and/or some form of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).

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