Development of a Communicative Disorders Training Program for Rwanda: Joining the Dots Communication disabilities remain a challenge worldwide but more especially in the developing world. Unpublished data from the recently concluded categorization of persons with disabilities (PWDs) conducted in Rwanda estimated that approximately 40% of PWDs have a disorder of speech, language, or hearing. Based on challenges faced by clinicians during patient ... Article
Article  |   December 18, 2017
Development of a Communicative Disorders Training Program for Rwanda: Joining the Dots
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kaitesi Batamuliza Mukara
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda
  • David K. Tumusiime
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Helen Barrett
    Department of Speech Therapy, Communicability Global, Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Segerien R. Donner
    Volunteer, Speech and Language Therapy, Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Jeanne N. Kagwiza
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Joyce Murenzi
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Kaitesi Batamuliza Mukarahas has no relevant financial interests to disclose. David K. Tumusiime has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Helen Barrett has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Segerien R. Donner has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Jeanne N. Kagwiza has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Joyce Murenzi has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Kaitesi Batamuliza Mukarahas has no relevant financial interests to disclose. David K. Tumusiime has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Helen Barrett has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Segerien R. Donner has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Jeanne N. Kagwiza has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Joyce Murenzi has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Kaitesi Batamuliza Mukara has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. David K. Tumusiime has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Helen Barrett has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Segerien R. Donner has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Jeanne N. Kagwiza has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Joyce Murenzi has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Kaitesi Batamuliza Mukara has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. David K. Tumusiime has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Helen Barrett has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Segerien R. Donner has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Jeanne N. Kagwiza has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Joyce Murenzi has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / International & Global / Language Disorders / Part 2
Article   |   December 18, 2017
Development of a Communicative Disorders Training Program for Rwanda: Joining the Dots
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 96-104. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG17.96
History: Received September 18, 2016 , Accepted November 6, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 96-104. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG17.96
History: Received September 18, 2016; Accepted November 6, 2016

Communication disabilities remain a challenge worldwide but more especially in the developing world. Unpublished data from the recently concluded categorization of persons with disabilities (PWDs) conducted in Rwanda estimated that approximately 40% of PWDs have a disorder of speech, language, or hearing. Based on challenges faced by clinicians during patient care, a decision to start a training program was reached and shared with university of Rwanda administration in 2012 to solicit support to offer the intended programs. The discussions and curricula planning culminated in a participatory stakeholder validation workshop in February 2016 with the purpose of brainstorming the way forward towards approval and implementation of the programs. Subsequently, in May 2016, a strategic planning workshop was held with the objective of mapping resources and budgeting for the long-term sustainability of the programs as well as establishment of the professions and employability of graduates. Currently, the important step is to get funding for the curricula implementation. Thus, this paper describes the process of development of two programs to train a cadre of professionals in communication disorders; specifically speech and language and audiology and solicits any potential and interested funder to partner with the University of Rwanda.

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to thank the following organisations and individuals for their support: University of Rwanda: Prof. Phil Cotton; Boston Children's Hospital, USA: Lauralyn Chetwynd, Cheryl Edwards; Manchester Metropolitan University, UK: Dr. Julie Marshall; Voluntary Services Overseas, UK: April Lyons, Lorraine Todd, Claire Cahoon, and Amy Driskell Rwandan; and other external SLPs: Iyakaremye Silas, Tumusiime Joseph, Munyankindi Eli, Anna Reed, Maud Thomine Desmazures, Bente Scheers, and Jenna Handley
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