Voice Therapy for the Beginning Clinician This article is written specifically for recent graduates of Speech-Language Pathology programs or clinicians with little experience in providing voice therapy for the approximately 88 million people in the United States who will suffer from a voice disorder in their lifetime (Cohen, Kim, Roy, Asche, & Courey, 2012; Roy, Merrill, ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2017
Voice Therapy for the Beginning Clinician
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jackie Gartner-Schmidt
    Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Ali Lewandowski
    Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Marc Haxer
    Michigan Otolaryngology Surgery Associates, Ypsilanti, MI
  • Claudio F. Milstein
    The Voice Center, Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Jackie Gartner-Schmidt, Ali Lewandowski, Marc Haxer, and Claudio F. Milstein have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Jackie Gartner-Schmidt, Ali Lewandowski, Marc Haxer, and Claudio F. Milstein have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Jackie Gartner-Schmidt, Ali Lewandowski, Marc Haxer, and Claudio F. Milstein have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Jackie Gartner-Schmidt, Ali Lewandowski, Marc Haxer, and Claudio F. Milstein have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Part 3
Article   |   December 01, 2017
Voice Therapy for the Beginning Clinician
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 93-103. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG3.93
History: Received July 25, 2017 , Accepted September 8, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2017, Vol. 2, 93-103. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG3.93
History: Received July 25, 2017; Accepted September 8, 2017

This article is written specifically for recent graduates of Speech-Language Pathology programs or clinicians with little experience in providing voice therapy for the approximately 88 million people in the United States who will suffer from a voice disorder in their lifetime (Cohen, Kim, Roy, Asche, & Courey, 2012; Roy, Merrill, Gray, & Smith, 2005; United States Census Bureau, n.d.). Voice therapy is a patient-centered treatment paradigm used to modify behaviors that cause and/or contribute to voice disorders. A critical need exists to train novice clinicians to perform voice therapy who may, or may not, have had dedicated training in their academic programs and/or Clinical Fellowship (CF). The article is divided into the following sections: (1) Appropriate Referrals for Voice Therapy, (2). A Voice Therapy Framework, (3) Scientific Rationale for Differing Voice Therapy Techniques, and (4) When to Discharge Patients from Voice Therapy.

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