New Car, Same Principles: Using Language Development Theories to Drive the Design of Supportive Augmentative and Alternative Communication System Interfaces Innovations in technology have resulted in increased use of tablets, mobile devices, and applications as augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems for children with complex communication needs (CCN). Although research has been conducted on the specific characteristics of AAC technologies, many interfaces remain replications of prior communication devices with little ... Article
Article  |   November 15, 2017
New Car, Same Principles: Using Language Development Theories to Drive the Design of Supportive Augmentative and Alternative Communication System Interfaces
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jamie B. Boster
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Ohio University, Athens, OH
  • Joann P. Benigno
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Ohio University, Athens, OH
  • John W. McCarthy
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Ohio University, Athens, OH
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Jamie B. Boster, Joann P. Benigno, and John W. McCarthy have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Jamie B. Boster, Joann P. Benigno, and John W. McCarthy have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Jamie B. Boster, Joann P. Benigno, and John W. McCarthy have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Jamie B. Boster, Joann P. Benigno, and John W. McCarthy have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Development / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Part 2
Article   |   November 15, 2017
New Car, Same Principles: Using Language Development Theories to Drive the Design of Supportive Augmentative and Alternative Communication System Interfaces
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, November 2017, Vol. 2, 40-54. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG12.40
History: Received January 30, 2017 , Revised June 5, 2017 , Accepted July 14, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, November 2017, Vol. 2, 40-54. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG12.40
History: Received January 30, 2017; Revised June 5, 2017; Accepted July 14, 2017

Innovations in technology have resulted in increased use of tablets, mobile devices, and applications as augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems for children with complex communication needs (CCN). Although research has been conducted on the specific characteristics of AAC technologies, many interfaces remain replications of prior communication devices with little consideration of the features of newer platforms. A greater concern is that these interfaces may not be based on empirical evidence or derived from key developmental language theories. As such, these interfaces may place additional demands on children with CCN instead of supporting their development of language content, form, and use. The purpose of this paper is to discuss potential interface supports for AAC systems that capitalize on current technologies and draw upon key tenets of developmental theory.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.