Decolonizing Speech-Language Pathology Practice in Acquired Neurogenic Disorders Indigenous peoples throughout the world, despite being known to suffer from increased risk of stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI), are marginalised in terms of access to rehabilitation services and have poorer health outcomes than non-indigenous peoples. Speech-language pathology services for indigenous people with aphasia have rarely been discussed in ... Article
Article  |   November 13, 2017
Decolonizing Speech-Language Pathology Practice in Acquired Neurogenic Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Claire Penn
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • Elizabeth Armstrong
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
  • Karen Brewer
    Te Kupenga Hauora Maori, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Barbara Purves
    School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Meaghan McAllister
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
  • Deborah Hersh
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
  • Erin Godecke
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
  • Natalie Ciccone
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
  • Abigail Lewis
    School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: The authors have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: The authors have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Part 3
Article   |   November 13, 2017
Decolonizing Speech-Language Pathology Practice in Acquired Neurogenic Disorders
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, November 2017, Vol. 2, 91-99. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.91
History: Received February 26, 2017 , Revised July 29, 2017 , Accepted August 3, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, November 2017, Vol. 2, 91-99. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.91
History: Received February 26, 2017; Revised July 29, 2017; Accepted August 3, 2017

Indigenous peoples throughout the world, despite being known to suffer from increased risk of stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI), are marginalised in terms of access to rehabilitation services and have poorer health outcomes than non-indigenous peoples. Speech-language pathology services for indigenous people with aphasia have rarely been discussed in either clinical or research fora in this field, with few guidelines available for clinicians when working with indigenous clients, families, and communities. Exploiting the broad input gathered through the collective problem-solving of a focus group, the paper integrates the input of a group of practitioners and researchers at an international roundtable held in 2016 to generate a “declaration” of issues that need to be addressed regarding aphasia services for indigenous clients with aphasia. The paper aims to promote a transformative approach to service delivery that is driven by decolonizing attitudes and practices, and acknowledges historical, sociopolitical, linguistic, and family contexts as a framework for understanding indigenous clients with aphasia.

Acknowledgments
We wish to acknowledge Whaawei Taki from the University of Auckland, for her invaluable input to the roundtable discussions associated with this work.
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