Generational Considerations for Counseling Older Adults Advances in health care are providing for greater longevity among older Americans. The result is an increasing proportion of elderly on the caseloads of speech-language pathologists, a pattern likely to continue. When counseling older adults, special caveats related to generational identification and contextual factors must inform counseling interactions. Younger clinicians ... Article
Article  |   October 31, 2017
Generational Considerations for Counseling Older Adults
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amanda Stead
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR
  • Michael Flahive
    Alexandria, Virginia
  • Caitlin Fitzgerald
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR
  • Marcia Frost
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Amanda Stead, Michael Flahive, Caitlin Fitzgerald, and Marcia Frost have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Amanda Stead, Michael Flahive, Caitlin Fitzgerald, and Marcia Frost have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Amanda Stead, Michael Flahive, Caitlin Fitzgerald, and Marcia Frost have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Amanda Stead, Michael Flahive, Caitlin Fitzgerald, and Marcia Frost have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Part 2
Article   |   October 31, 2017
Generational Considerations for Counseling Older Adults
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2017, Vol. 2, 42-52. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG15.42
History: Received March 18, 2017 , Revised July 31, 2017 , Accepted August 5, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2017, Vol. 2, 42-52. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG15.42
History: Received March 18, 2017; Revised July 31, 2017; Accepted August 5, 2017

Advances in health care are providing for greater longevity among older Americans. The result is an increasing proportion of elderly on the caseloads of speech-language pathologists, a pattern likely to continue. When counseling older adults, special caveats related to generational identification and contextual factors must inform counseling interactions. Younger clinicians may demonstrate communication styles and behaviors influenced by biases about older adults that interfere with potential effectiveness. Careful training of clinicians in both geriatrics and counseling may improve outcomes; however, such training is limited in most graduate programs. This paper discusses work with older generations and possible solutions for training future clinicians to be best prepared for this aspect of our service.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.