The Changing Landscape of Vocal Needs in the Aging Baby Boomer Aging is a natural part of the human condition and the voice is not spared changes with increasing age. There is a progressive decline in the respiratory, phonatory, and resonatory systems associated with aging as a result of sarcopenia, metabolic slowing, and changes to the neuromuscular system that begin earlier ... Article
Article  |   October 24, 2017
The Changing Landscape of Vocal Needs in the Aging Baby Boomer
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edie R. Hapner
    Caruso Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, USC Voice Center, Los Angeles, CA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Edie R. Hapner has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Edie R. Hapner has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: This is a descriptive paper and, as such, information in this paper has been part of previous presentations that Edie Hapner has done on aging voice.
    Nonfinancial: This is a descriptive paper and, as such, information in this paper has been part of previous presentations that Edie Hapner has done on aging voice.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 2
Article   |   October 24, 2017
The Changing Landscape of Vocal Needs in the Aging Baby Boomer
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2017, Vol. 2, 24-31. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG15.24
History: Received January 8, 2017 , Revised April 4, 2017 , Accepted April 7, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2017, Vol. 2, 24-31. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG15.24
History: Received January 8, 2017; Revised April 4, 2017; Accepted April 7, 2017
Abstract

Aging is a natural part of the human condition and the voice is not spared changes with increasing age. There is a progressive decline in the respiratory, phonatory, and resonatory systems associated with aging as a result of sarcopenia, metabolic slowing, and changes to the neuromuscular system that begin earlier in life but accelerate at 60 years. Behavioral and surgical treatments offer people with age-related voice loss (presbyphonia) the opportunity for improved voice quality of life. Interest in these treatments has risen over the past 20 years with the arrival of the baby boom generation reaching 65 years and experiencing age-related changes to voice. Unlike their parents, many baby boomers are not able to retire at 65 years and are required to maintain and even improve their vocal endurance and vocal quality for occupational demands. This article will explore age-related changes to the body, specific to the vocal mechanism, and a summary of several treatments available to improve the voice in light of the changing needs of the baby boom generation as they get older.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.