Inclusion of Transgender Voice and Communication Training in a University Clinic Because of the increasing number of transgender people requesting speech-language pathology services, because having gender-incongruent voice and communication has major negative impacts on an individual's social participation and well-being, and because voice and communication training is supported by an improving evidence-base, it is becoming more common for universities to include ... Article
Article  |   October 12, 2017
Inclusion of Transgender Voice and Communication Training in a University Clinic
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Oates
    Discipline of Speech Pathology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Georgia Dacakis
    Discipline of Speech Pathology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Jennifer Oates and Georgia Dacakis have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Jennifer Oates and Georgia Dacakis have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Some of this information was presented in a symposium at the 2016 World Professional Association of Transgender Health Conference, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Nonfinancial: Some of this information was presented in a symposium at the 2016 World Professional Association of Transgender Health Conference, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Transgender / Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 2
Article   |   October 12, 2017
Inclusion of Transgender Voice and Communication Training in a University Clinic
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2017, Vol. 2, 109-115. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG10.109
History: Received January 12, 2017 , Revised March 16, 2017 , Accepted April 20, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2017, Vol. 2, 109-115. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG10.109
History: Received January 12, 2017; Revised March 16, 2017; Accepted April 20, 2017

Because of the increasing number of transgender people requesting speech-language pathology services, because having gender-incongruent voice and communication has major negative impacts on an individual's social participation and well-being, and because voice and communication training is supported by an improving evidence-base, it is becoming more common for universities to include transgender-specific theoretical and clinical components in their speech-language pathology programs. This paper describes the theoretical and clinical education provided to speech-language pathology students at La Trobe University in Australia, with a particular focus on the voice and communication training program offered by the La Trobe Communication Clinic. Further research is required to determine the outcomes of the clinic's training program in terms of student confidence and competence as well as the effectiveness of training for transgender clients.

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