Perceptions of Cluttering Among Communication Sciences and Disorders and Non Communication Sciences and Disorders Students Purpose The aim of this study was to compare perceptions of cluttering of undergraduate Communication Sciences and Disorders majors with perceptions of non-majors. Method A total of 79 undergraduate students served as participants; 37 students were Communications Sciences and Disorders majors enrolled in an introductory-level course. The other ... Article
Article  |   October 10, 2017
Perceptions of Cluttering Among Communication Sciences and Disorders and Non Communication Sciences and Disorders Students
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul G. Blanchet
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Baylor University, Waco, TX
  • Greg Snyder
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, The University of Mississippi, University, MS
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Paul G. Blanchet and Greg Snyder have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Paul G. Blanchet and Greg Snyder have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Paul G. Blanchet and Greg Snyder have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Paul G. Blanchet and Greg Snyder have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Part 2
Article   |   October 10, 2017
Perceptions of Cluttering Among Communication Sciences and Disorders and Non Communication Sciences and Disorders Students
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2017, Vol. 2, 43-53. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG4.43
History: Received February 4, 2017 , Revised May 10, 2017 , Accepted May 24, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, October 2017, Vol. 2, 43-53. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG4.43
History: Received February 4, 2017; Revised May 10, 2017; Accepted May 24, 2017

Purpose The aim of this study was to compare perceptions of cluttering of undergraduate Communication Sciences and Disorders majors with perceptions of non-majors.

Method A total of 79 undergraduate students served as participants; 37 students were Communications Sciences and Disorders majors enrolled in an introductory-level course. The other 42 students were recruited from nutrition courses in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences. All students were provided with a written definition of cluttering and also viewed a short segment of an educational video. Students then rated a person who clutters on a variety of speech skills and personality scales.

Results Results revealed that the Communication Sciences and Disorders students rated a person who clutters as exhibiting a significantly more inappropriate speech rate than did the Family and Consumer Sciences majors. However, results revealed no significant group differences in ratings of any personality traits.

Conclusions Findings do not support the presence of relatively positive perceptions of cluttering among Communication Sciences and Disorders majors, at least not prior to coursework or clinical training. Further research is needed to replicate these findings with larger sample sizes, and to assess attitudes of these students before and after coursework and/or clinical training in fluency disorders.

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