Telehealth for Dysphagia Rehabilitation: The Present and the Future Dysphagia affects about nine million adults and half a million children annually in the United States alone, and its prevalence is only projected to increase as the baby boomer generation grows older. For many individuals who live in rural or underserved areas, accessing a speech-language pathologist (SLP) with expertise in ... Article
Article  |   September 29, 2017
Telehealth for Dysphagia Rehabilitation: The Present and the Future
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Georgia A. Malandraki
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Cagla Kantarcigil
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Georgia A. Malandraki has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Cagla Kantarcigil has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Georgia A. Malandraki has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Cagla Kantarcigil has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Georgia A. Malandraki has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Cagla Kantarcigil has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Georgia A. Malandraki has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Cagla Kantarcigil has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Part 2
Article   |   September 29, 2017
Telehealth for Dysphagia Rehabilitation: The Present and the Future
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2017, Vol. 2, 42-48. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG18.42
History: Received March 19, 2017 , Revised June 6, 2017 , Accepted June 11, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2017, Vol. 2, 42-48. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG18.42
History: Received March 19, 2017; Revised June 6, 2017; Accepted June 11, 2017

Dysphagia affects about nine million adults and half a million children annually in the United States alone, and its prevalence is only projected to increase as the baby boomer generation grows older. For many individuals who live in rural or underserved areas, accessing a speech-language pathologist (SLP) with expertise in dysphagia can be challenging. Telehealth appears to be a viable solution to address the needs of individuals living in these areas, and for patients and clinicians with mobility/access limitations. This article provides an overview of the current research evidence in dysphagia telehealth and identifies research and clinical practice gaps as well as potential solutions. Our aim is to provide foundational knowledge for dysphagia clinicians who are interested in entering the telehealth arena.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.