The Development of Speech-Language Pathology in Zambia: A Reflection on the Current Landscape and Two Contrasting Training Models Functional approaches to disability measurement in Zambia reveals an overall disability prevalence rate of 13.4%, 4% of whom are recorded as having “speech impairment” (Zambia Federation of the Disabled [ZAFOD], 2006). Further, multidimensional poverty assessments indicate that 48.6% of Zambia's approximately 16 million citizens are impoverished. Currently, there are three ... Article
Article  |   September 15, 2017
The Development of Speech-Language Pathology in Zambia: A Reflection on the Current Landscape and Two Contrasting Training Models
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzanna Bright
    Program Director, CLASP International, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • Chisomo Selemani
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Baldwin Wallace University, Berea, OH
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Chisomo Selemani is an assistant professor at Baldwin Wallace University. Suzanna Bright is the former Program Director of CLASP International.
    Financial: Chisomo Selemani is an assistant professor at Baldwin Wallace University. Suzanna Bright is the former Program Director of CLASP International.×
  • Nonfinancial: Chisomo Selemani has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Suzanna Bright has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Chisomo Selemani has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Suzanna Bright has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / International & Global / Language Disorders / Part 2
Article   |   September 15, 2017
The Development of Speech-Language Pathology in Zambia: A Reflection on the Current Landscape and Two Contrasting Training Models
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2017, Vol. 2, 63-72. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG17.63
History: Received October 3, 2016 , Revised November 25, 2016 , Accepted December 22, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2017, Vol. 2, 63-72. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG17.63
History: Received October 3, 2016; Revised November 25, 2016; Accepted December 22, 2016

Functional approaches to disability measurement in Zambia reveals an overall disability prevalence rate of 13.4%, 4% of whom are recorded as having “speech impairment” (Zambia Federation of the Disabled [ZAFOD], 2006). Further, multidimensional poverty assessments indicate that 48.6% of Zambia's approximately 16 million citizens are impoverished. Currently, there are three internationally qualified speech-language pathologists (SLPs) providing services within Zambia's capital city, Lusaka. Given these statistics, it follows that a significant number of Zambian's, experiencing communication disability, are unable to access specialist assessment and support. Over the past decade, Zambia has seen two very different approaches to address this service gap—firstly, a larger scale top-down approach through the implementation of a formal master's degree program and more recently a smaller scale, bottom-up approach, building the capacity of existing professionals working in the field of communication disability. This article provides an overview of both programs and the context, unique to Zambia, in which they have developed. Authors describe the implementation challenges encountered and program successes leading to a discussion of the weakness and merits to both programs, in an attempt to draw lessons from which future efforts to support communication disability and SLP service development in Majority World contexts may benefit.

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to acknowledge Dr. Alfred Mwamba, Dr. Beatrice Matafwali, Mr. Mwenya M. Mwamba, Mrs. Pezo Mumbi, Ms. Caitlyn Wessels, Dr. Kankasa and the members of the CLASP International team, the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at Baldwin Wallace University, and the University of Zambia Department of Educational Psychology, Sociology and Special Education for their work to develop the field of communication disorders in Zambia, and their contributions to this article.
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