Practioner Reflection That Enhances Interprofessional Collaborative Practices for Serving Children Who Are Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Interprofessional collaboration is essential to maximize outcomes of young children who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing (DHH). Speech-language pathologists, audiologists, educators, developmental therapists, and parents need to work together to ensure the child's hearing technology is fit appropriately to maximize performance in the various communication settings the child encounters. However, although ... Article
Article  |   August 10, 2017
Practioner Reflection That Enhances Interprofessional Collaborative Practices for Serving Children Who Are Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristina M. Blaiser
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Idaho State University, Meridian, Idaho
  • Mary Ellen Nevins
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Kristina M. Blaiser and Mary Ellen Nevins have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Kristina M. Blaiser and Mary Ellen Nevins have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Similar information was presented by the authors at the 2016 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
    Nonfinancial: Similar information was presented by the authors at the 2016 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Part 1
Article   |   August 10, 2017
Practioner Reflection That Enhances Interprofessional Collaborative Practices for Serving Children Who Are Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2017, Vol. 2, 3-9. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG9.3
History: Received January 31, 2017 , Revised March 17, 2017 , Accepted May 16, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2017, Vol. 2, 3-9. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG9.3
History: Received January 31, 2017; Revised March 17, 2017; Accepted May 16, 2017

Interprofessional collaboration is essential to maximize outcomes of young children who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing (DHH). Speech-language pathologists, audiologists, educators, developmental therapists, and parents need to work together to ensure the child's hearing technology is fit appropriately to maximize performance in the various communication settings the child encounters. However, although interprofessional collaboration is a key concept in communication sciences and disorders, there is often a disconnect between what is regarded as best professional practice and the self-work needed to put true collaboration into practice. This paper offers practical tools, processes, and suggestions for service providers related to the self-awareness that is often required (yet seldom acknowledged) to create interprofessional teams with the dispositions and behaviors that enhance patient/client care.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.