Guest Editor's Column For pediatric speech language pathologists and researchers, one of the greatest challenges revolves around the use of best practices for diagnosing and treating children with motor speech disorders. At the center of this challenge is the differential diagnosis and treatment of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). At present, no ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   August 02, 2017
Guest Editor's Column
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Coordinator's Column   |   August 02, 2017
Guest Editor's Column
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2017, Vol. 2, 46. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.46
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2017, Vol. 2, 46. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.46
For pediatric speech language pathologists and researchers, one of the greatest challenges revolves around the use of best practices for diagnosing and treating children with motor speech disorders. At the center of this challenge is the differential diagnosis and treatment of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). At present, no validated list of diagnostic criteria exists to differentiate CAS from other speech sound disorders. In addition, even though researchers have recently started to be more explicit about the diagnostic criteria they use to form a differential diagnosis, operational definitions of these criteria often remain unpublished (Murray, McCabe, Heard, & Ballard, 2015), making it difficult to apply these clinically. In the first article in this issue, Drs. Murray and Iuzzini-Seigel provide operational definitions for speech features that are commonly used to differentiate CAS from other speech sound disorders and provide a review of literature on which features these are based. In addition, they use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework (World Health Organization, 2002) to describe how CAS affects body structure and function, how it impacts activities and participation, and how personal factors may influence prognosis. In the second article, Drs. Murray and Iuzzini-Seigel provide a review of best treatment practices for children with CAS, again using the ICF framework to highlight factors that should be considered when treating this population.
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