Understanding Word Reading Difficulties in Children With SLI Children with specific language impairment (SLI) often show considerable reading difficulties. Research has revealed two primary reading profiles among children with SLI: (a) one of poor word reading and decoding skills and associated reading comprehension difficulties, and (b) one involving relatively strong word reading skills but poor comprehension. This article ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2017
Understanding Word Reading Difficulties in Children With SLI
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzanne M. Adlof
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: The research reported in this manuscript was supported, in part, by a grant from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R03DC013399). The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
    Financial: The research reported in this manuscript was supported, in part, by a grant from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R03DC013399). The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.×
  • Nonfinancial: Suzanne Adlof has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Suzanne Adlof has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Part 2
Article   |   August 01, 2017
Understanding Word Reading Difficulties in Children With SLI
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2017, Vol. 2, 71-77. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG1.71
History: Received February 17, 2017 , Revised May 19, 2017 , Accepted May 30, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, August 2017, Vol. 2, 71-77. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG1.71
History: Received February 17, 2017; Revised May 19, 2017; Accepted May 30, 2017

Children with specific language impairment (SLI) often show considerable reading difficulties. Research has revealed two primary reading profiles among children with SLI: (a) one of poor word reading and decoding skills and associated reading comprehension difficulties, and (b) one involving relatively strong word reading skills but poor comprehension. This article reviews studies characterizing these two subtypes of SLI, discusses their current clinical implications, and suggests important directions for future study.

Acknowledgment
I am grateful to Alison Hendricks and Joanna Scoggins for feedback on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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