Speech-Language Assessment Considerations for American Indian and Alaska Native Children Who Are Dual Language Learners The overrepresentation of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children in special education, including children who are dual language learners (DLLs), is a major concern. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can play a critical role in reducing this overrepresentation. Using a holistic assessment process that is responsive to the communication patterns of ... Article
Article  |   July 19, 2017
Speech-Language Assessment Considerations for American Indian and Alaska Native Children Who Are Dual Language Learners
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine Vining
    Center for Development and Disability, University of New Mexico/Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM
  • Edgarita Long
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK
  • Ella Inglebret
    Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, Washington State University, Spokane, WA
  • Megan Brendal
    Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, Washington State University, Spokane, WA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Christine Vining has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Edgarita Long has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Ella Inglebret has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Megan Brendal has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Christine Vining has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Edgarita Long has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Ella Inglebret has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Megan Brendal has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Christine Vining has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Edgarita Long has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Ella Inglebret has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Megan Brendal has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Christine Vining has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Edgarita Long has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Ella Inglebret has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Megan Brendal has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Part 2
Article   |   July 19, 2017
Speech-Language Assessment Considerations for American Indian and Alaska Native Children Who Are Dual Language Learners
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, July 2017, Vol. 2, 29-40. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG14.29
History: Received February 15, 2017 , Revised May 18, 2017 , Accepted May 23, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, July 2017, Vol. 2, 29-40. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG14.29
History: Received February 15, 2017; Revised May 18, 2017; Accepted May 23, 2017

The overrepresentation of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children in special education, including children who are dual language learners (DLLs), is a major concern. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can play a critical role in reducing this overrepresentation. Using a holistic assessment process that is responsive to the communication patterns of home and community contexts provides a framework for distinguishing actual language disorders from differences associated with cultural and linguistic diversity. This article presents current trends in Native communities that may impact the speech-language assessment process, including a shift from indigenous languages to English and/or Native language revitalization efforts. It also provides a framework for guiding assessment in a manner that considers cultural and linguistic factors in speech-language assessment for AI/AN children who are DLLs.

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