Multiple Perspectives on the Barriers to Identification and Management of Pediatric Voice Disorders Pediatric voice disorders are typically a low-incidence population in the average caseload of clinicians working within school and general clinic settings. This occurs despite evidence of a fairly high prevalence of childhood voice disorders and the multiple impacts the voice disorder may have on a child's social development, the perception ... Article
Article  |   June 30, 2017
Multiple Perspectives on the Barriers to Identification and Management of Pediatric Voice Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jana Childes
    Oregon Health Science University, Portland, OR
  • Alissa Acker
    School District of Superior, Superior, Wisconsin
  • Dana Collins
    University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Jana Childes, Alissa Acker, and Dana Collins have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Jana Childes, Alissa Acker, and Dana Collins have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: A presentation of the same topic was given by the three authors at the ASHA Connect 2016 Conference.
    Nonfinancial: A presentation of the same topic was given by the three authors at the ASHA Connect 2016 Conference.×
Article Information
Part 2
Article   |   June 30, 2017
Multiple Perspectives on the Barriers to Identification and Management of Pediatric Voice Disorders
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2017, Vol. 2, 49-56. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG3.49
History: Received December 29, 2016 , Revised January 27, 2017 , Accepted March 2, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2017, Vol. 2, 49-56. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG3.49
History: Received December 29, 2016; Revised January 27, 2017; Accepted March 2, 2017

Pediatric voice disorders are typically a low-incidence population in the average caseload of clinicians working within school and general clinic settings. This occurs despite evidence of a fairly high prevalence of childhood voice disorders and the multiple impacts the voice disorder may have on a child's social development, the perception of the child by others, and the child's academic success. There are multiple barriers that affect the identification of children with abnormal vocal qualities and their access to services. These include: the reliance on school personnel, the ability of parents and caretakers to identify abnormal vocal qualities and signs of misuse, the access to specialized medical services for appropriate diagnosis, and treatment planning and issues related to the Speech-Language Pathologists' perception of their skills and competence regarding voice management for pediatric populations. These barriers and possible solutions to them are discussed with perspectives from the school, clinic and university settings.

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