Multimodal Communication Program for Adults: Cognitive Considerations People with complex communication needs often rely on a system of augmentative and alternative communication strategies. The Multimodal Communication Program (MCP) was developed for people with aphasia, but was also explored with people with traumatic brain injury. MCP aims to increase breakdown resolution via integrated instruction in multiple communication modalities. ... Article
Article  |   June 14, 2017
Multimodal Communication Program for Adults: Cognitive Considerations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah E. Wallace
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Sarah Diehl
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Sarah Wallace and Sarah Diehl have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Sarah Wallace and Sarah Diehl have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Sarah Wallace has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. This information has been presented as part of Sarah Diehl's Master's Thesis project at the ASHA Convention and in her unpublished Master's Thesis document.
    Nonfinancial: Sarah Wallace has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. This information has been presented as part of Sarah Diehl's Master's Thesis project at the ASHA Convention and in her unpublished Master's Thesis document.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Part 1
Article   |   June 14, 2017
Multimodal Communication Program for Adults: Cognitive Considerations
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2017, Vol. 2, 4-12. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG12.4
History: Received March 9, 2017 , Revised April 24, 2017 , Accepted May 5, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2017, Vol. 2, 4-12. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG12.4
History: Received March 9, 2017; Revised April 24, 2017; Accepted May 5, 2017

People with complex communication needs often rely on a system of augmentative and alternative communication strategies. The Multimodal Communication Program (MCP) was developed for people with aphasia, but was also explored with people with traumatic brain injury. MCP aims to increase breakdown resolution via integrated instruction in multiple communication modalities. Although implementation and results vary across studies, factors such as cognitive impairments warrant further investigation and potential modifications. The purpose of this article was to review the effect of cognitive impairments during implementation of MCP relative to cognitive impairments. Recommendations and considerations for the clinicians are provided.

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