The Impact of Presupposition on the Syntax and Morphology of a Child Who Uses AAC Children with complex communication needs often rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) to communicate. Use of AAC can result in messages with limited syntax and morphology that are difficult for communication partners to understand. This case study examines the linguistic productions of a child who uses high-tech AAC, with ... Article
Article  |   June 14, 2017
The Impact of Presupposition on the Syntax and Morphology of a Child Who Uses AAC
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patti L. Solomon-Rice
    Department of Special Education and Communicative Disorders, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA
  • Gloria Soto
    Department of Special Education and Communicative Disorders, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA
  • Wesley Heidenreich
    San Francisco Unified School District, San Francisco, CA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Patti L. Solomon-Rice, Gloria Soto, and Wesley Heidenreich have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Patti L. Solomon-Rice, Gloria Soto, and Wesley Heidenreich have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Patti L. Solomon-Rice, Gloria Soto, and Wesley Heidenreich have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Patti L. Solomon-Rice, Gloria Soto, and Wesley Heidenreich have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Part 1
Article   |   June 14, 2017
The Impact of Presupposition on the Syntax and Morphology of a Child Who Uses AAC
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2017, Vol. 2, 13-22. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG12.13
History: Received January 31, 2017 , Accepted March 14, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, June 2017, Vol. 2, 13-22. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG12.13
History: Received January 31, 2017; Accepted March 14, 2017

Children with complex communication needs often rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) to communicate. Use of AAC can result in messages with limited syntax and morphology that are difficult for communication partners to understand. This case study examines the linguistic productions of a child who uses high-tech AAC, with emerging literacy skills, under two pragmatic presupposition conditions. In Condition 1, the child believes the communication partner has a larger amount of background information about the topic being discussed. In Condition 2, the child presupposes the communication partner has less background information about the topic being discussed. Condition 2 resulted in the child's production of more complex morphology and syntax in comparison to Condition 1. The results suggest pragmatic presupposition might have impacted the level of morphologic and syntactic complexity produced. Possible clinical implications and suggestions for facilitating production of linguistically complex sentences are discussed.

Acknowledgements
This study was carried out by the third author in partial fulfillment of the Master of Science in Communicative Disorders at San Francisco State University.
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