Radiation 101: A Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists Dysphagia, or disordered swallowing, is an unfortunate consequence for individuals with a head and neck cancer diagnosis. Swallowing is altered in many ways due to tumor location and presence, and afterwards due to the mechanisms of tumor eradication. As a common treatment, radiation therapy (RT) has been proven to halt ... Article
Article  |   April 18, 2017
Radiation 101: A Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carly Barbon
    Swallowing Rehabilitation Research Laboratory, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario Canada
  • Andrew Hope
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital Cancer Centre Ringgold Standard Institution, Toronto, Ontario Canada
    Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital,, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Catriona Steele
    University Health Network–Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario Canada
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Carly Barbon has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Andrew Hope has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Catriona Steele has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Carly Barbon has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Andrew Hope has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Catriona Steele has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Carly Barbon has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Andrew Hope has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Catriona Steele has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Carly Barbon has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Andrew Hope has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Catriona Steele has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Part 2
Article   |   April 18, 2017
Radiation 101: A Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2017, Vol. 2, 63-72. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG13.63
History: Received June 17, 2016 , Revised July 15, 2016 , Accepted July 18, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2017, Vol. 2, 63-72. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG13.63
History: Received June 17, 2016; Revised July 15, 2016; Accepted July 18, 2016

Dysphagia, or disordered swallowing, is an unfortunate consequence for individuals with a head and neck cancer diagnosis. Swallowing is altered in many ways due to tumor location and presence, and afterwards due to the mechanisms of tumor eradication. As a common treatment, radiation therapy (RT) has been proven to halt tumor progression and kill quickly growing cancer cells. However, the side effects of such treatments are often prominent in this patient population. As swallowing professionals, it is important that speech-language pathologists (SLPs) understand the repercussions of RT for those patients undergoing such treatments. This paper aims to provide a basic overview of RT for clinicians working with head and neck cancer patients.

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