Demonstrating Professionalism and Skill in Dysphagia Documentation Documentation of services provided to patients serves many purposes, the primary reason being to assure that appropriate services are provided to the patient and recorded accurately. Reading the documentation is the only way that other providers and payers have of knowing what services were rendered and the outcome of the ... Article
Article  |   April 18, 2017
Demonstrating Professionalism and Skill in Dysphagia Documentation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy B. Swigert
    Process Excellence Coordinator, Outcomes Department, Baptist Health Lexington, Lexington, KY
    Swigert & Assoc, Inc., Lexington, KY
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Nancy B. Swigert has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Nancy B. Swigert has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Nancy B. Swigert has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Nancy B. Swigert has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Part 2
Article   |   April 18, 2017
Demonstrating Professionalism and Skill in Dysphagia Documentation
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2017, Vol. 2, 49-56. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG13.49
History: Revised November 29, 2016 , Accepted December 5, 2016 , Received October 28, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2017, Vol. 2, 49-56. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG13.49
History: Revised November 29, 2016; Accepted December 5, 2016; Received October 28, 2017

Documentation of services provided to patients serves many purposes, the primary reason being to assure that appropriate services are provided to the patient and recorded accurately. Reading the documentation is the only way that other providers and payers have of knowing what services were rendered and the outcome of the intervention. The quality of those services, and by association, the level of skill of the clinician providing those services, is judged by the documentation. Documentation also serves business purposes such as supporting reimbursement of services rendered and demonstrating productivity. Facilities review records to see if they are meeting quality benchmarks. Facilities and payers review records to determine if services were appropriately utilized. Regulatory agencies review records to assure compliance with laws and regulations. Records are also used as the basis for research, particularly epidemiological studies. Every piece of documentation serves as a legal document. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need to assure that their documentation is professional and objective and that it follows accepted rules and guidelines for documentation.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.