University Students' Perceptions of a Person Who Clutters With or Without Video Education Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of video education about cluttering on students' perceptions of a person who clutters. Method A total of 193 undergraduate students served as participants. Ninety-five students were provided with a written definition of cluttering, while 98 were also ... Article
Article  |   April 11, 2017
University Students' Perceptions of a Person Who Clutters With or Without Video Education
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul G. Blanchet
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Baylor University, Waco, TX
  • Lindsey M. Farrell
    Waterfront Center for Rehabilitation, Buffalo, NY
  • Greg Snyder
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, The University of Mississippi, University, MS
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Paul G. Blanchet, Lindsey M. Farrell, and Greg Snyder have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Paul G. Blanchet, Lindsey M. Farrell, and Greg Snyder have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Paul G. Blanchet, Lindsey M. Farrell, and Greg Snyder have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Paul G. Blanchet, Lindsey M. Farrell, and Greg Snyder have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 1
Article   |   April 11, 2017
University Students' Perceptions of a Person Who Clutters With or Without Video Education
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2017, Vol. 2, 28-40. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG4.28
History: Received January 5, 2017 , Revised February 19, 2017 , Accepted March 8, 2017
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, April 2017, Vol. 2, 28-40. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG4.28
History: Received January 5, 2017; Revised February 19, 2017; Accepted March 8, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of video education about cluttering on students' perceptions of a person who clutters.

Method A total of 193 undergraduate students served as participants. Ninety-five students were provided with a written definition of cluttering, while 98 were also provided with video education about cluttering. Students then rated a person who clutters on speech and personality scales.

Results Results yielded significant group differences in ratings of intelligibility, speech rate, ease of listening, and competence. Respondents who viewed the educational video rated a person who clutters significantly more negatively along these dimensions than respondents who read a definition only. However, participants who did not view the video reported knowing significantly more people who clutter.

Conclusion Findings suggest that this particular form of video education might provide students with “realistic” exposure to cluttering. Further research is needed to assess effects of exposure to and interaction with a person who clutters on perceptions of cluttering. Implications include the impact of prior exposure to those who clutter, as well as potential confusion between cluttering and “fast speech.” These factors might have influenced identification rates of individuals who clutter, which could have affected the results.

Acknowledgment
The authors would like to extend a note of gratitude to the undergraduate students and course instructors for their participation in this study. We would also like to thank Jane Fraser of the Stuttering Foundation of America for granting us permission to show segments of the DVD, “Cluttering.” Last, we wish to thank the following undergraduate students their assistance in administering and collecting the surveys, as well as solicitation of participants: Alyson Johnson, Haley Root, Erin Novak, Tess Kucera, Savannah Davis, Merrie Harper, Jenise Thompson and Rachel Spencer.
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