Guest Editor's Column The nature of language impairment in aphasia is well studied and documented. Individuals with post-stroke aphasia have been reported to have trouble with almost all aspects of language processing that span phonology, semantics, morphology, grammar, pragmatics, and supra-segmental prosody. As these are the deficits that define aphasia, the majority ... Editorial
Editorial  |   March 01, 2017
Guest Editor's Column
Author Notes
Article Information
Part 1
Editorial   |   March 01, 2017
Guest Editor's Column
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2017, Vol. 2, 3-6. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.3
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2017, Vol. 2, 3-6. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.3
The nature of language impairment in aphasia is well studied and documented. Individuals with post-stroke aphasia have been reported to have trouble with almost all aspects of language processing that span phonology, semantics, morphology, grammar, pragmatics, and supra-segmental prosody. As these are the deficits that define aphasia, the majority of work in aphasia has focused on delineating the different taxonomic components in each of the broad domains outlined above, with the aim of improving diagnosis or therapy. Understanding whether a person with aphasia presents with semantic processing deficits, phonological deficits or both, for example, contributes to the characterization of that person's impairment and subsequent treatment (Kiran & Sandberg, 2011; Meier, Lo, & Kiran, 2016).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
All Perspectives articles & archives
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.