Considering Learning Ability in Language Rehabilitation Plans While aphasia is characterized by deficits in language, an increasing body of work is examining the presence of nonlinguistic cognitive deficits in aphasia. Among these cognitive processes is learning, a factor hypothesized to be important to the process of therapy, and which has been shown to be impaired in some ... Article
Article  |   February 28, 2017
Considering Learning Ability in Language Rehabilitation Plans
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sofia Vallila-Rohter
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH-Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Sofia Vallila-Rohter has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Sofia Vallila-Rohter has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Sofia Vallila-Rohter has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Sofia Vallila-Rohter has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Part 1
Article   |   February 28, 2017
Considering Learning Ability in Language Rehabilitation Plans
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, February 2017, Vol. 2, 23-30. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.23
History: Received November 1, 2016 , Revised November 14, 2016 , Accepted November 30, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, February 2017, Vol. 2, 23-30. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG2.23
History: Received November 1, 2016; Revised November 14, 2016; Accepted November 30, 2016

While aphasia is characterized by deficits in language, an increasing body of work is examining the presence of nonlinguistic cognitive deficits in aphasia. Among these cognitive processes is learning, a factor hypothesized to be important to the process of therapy, and which has been shown to be impaired in some individuals with aphasia. The current paper aims to: (a) draw attention to the cognitive deficits that have been identified in aphasia, (b) examine how large-scale brain network views help explain the presence of cognitive deficits in aphasia, (c) provide justification for the importance of considering learning in a program of aphasia rehabilitation, (d) highlight research that has identified and characterized the presence of multiple learning systems, and (e) examine recent research contributing to the field's current understanding of learning in aphasia. This body of work will be presented within a framework relevant for clinicians.

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