Exercise-Based Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Past, Present, and Future Dysphagia clinicians have long been charged with improving strength, skill, and endurance in order to rehabilitate oropharyngeal swallowing with little to no training in exercise science, theoretical underpinnings of exercise-based theory or motor learning. With this dearth of information, clinicians often turn to trial-and-error or tradition to devise treatment regimens. ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2017
Exercise-Based Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Past, Present, and Future
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lori Burkhead Morgan
    Department of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, Augusta, GA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Lori Burkhead Morgan has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Lori Burkhead Morgan has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Lori Burkhead Morgan has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Lori Burkhead Morgan has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Part 1
Article   |   March 01, 2017
Exercise-Based Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Past, Present, and Future
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2017, Vol. 2, 36-43. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG13.36
History: Received October 12, 2016 , Revised November 7, 2016 , Accepted November 7, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2017, Vol. 2, 36-43. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG13.36
History: Received October 12, 2016; Revised November 7, 2016; Accepted November 7, 2016

Dysphagia clinicians have long been charged with improving strength, skill, and endurance in order to rehabilitate oropharyngeal swallowing with little to no training in exercise science, theoretical underpinnings of exercise-based theory or motor learning. With this dearth of information, clinicians often turn to trial-and-error or tradition to devise treatment regimens. Exercise science and motor learning have received more attention in recent years as to how these concepts may (or may not) apply to the unique structure and function of the speech and swallowing musculature and, more specifically, in dysphagia rehabilitation. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of exercise science principles and to highlight some of the more recent work in dysphagia rehabilitation wherein some of these principles have been incorporated.

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