Pediatric Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Considering the Evidence to Support Common Strategies Dysphagia in pediatric populations can result in multiple adverse health outcomes. Therefore, childhood swallowing difficulties must be diagnosed accurately and managed appropriately. Effective therapy treatment requires careful consideration of available rehabilitative intervention techniques, and application of strategies that are best suited to rehabilitate the phase(s) of swallowing affected. In pediatric ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2017
Pediatric Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Considering the Evidence to Support Common Strategies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Memorie Gosa
    Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Pamela Dodrill
    Feeding & Developmeantal Therapy Team, Brigham & Women’s Hospital NICU, Boston, MA
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Memorie Gosa has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Pamela Dodrill has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Memorie Gosa has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Pamela Dodrill has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Memorie Gosa has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Pamela Dodrill has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Memorie Gosa has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose. Pamela Dodrill has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Part 1
Article   |   March 01, 2017
Pediatric Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Considering the Evidence to Support Common Strategies
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2017, Vol. 2, 27-35. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG13.27
History: Received July 21, 2016 , Accepted September 21, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, March 2017, Vol. 2, 27-35. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG13.27
History: Received July 21, 2016; Accepted September 21, 2016

Dysphagia in pediatric populations can result in multiple adverse health outcomes. Therefore, childhood swallowing difficulties must be diagnosed accurately and managed appropriately. Effective therapy treatment requires careful consideration of available rehabilitative intervention techniques, and application of strategies that are best suited to rehabilitate the phase(s) of swallowing affected. In pediatric populations, most literature to date has focused on rehabilitative strategies targeting the oral phase of swallowing, often referred to by labels including: oral motor exercises, oral motor interventions, and oral sensori-motor interventions. This article reviews the empirical evidence to support the use of rehabilitative interventions for infants and children with dysphagia, and offers a framework for pediatric clinicians to determine the most appropriate therapeutic targets.

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