Making a Case for Transmasculine Voice and Communication Training Transgender voice and communication training is an increasingly expanding service that is nevertheless not typically conducted for people who are seeking a more masculine presentation. It is commonly considered that testosterone administration, which many transmasculine people undergo to address gender dysphoria, lowers pitch sufficiently enough to not warrant training (Adler, ... Article
Article  |   February 27, 2017
Making a Case for Transmasculine Voice and Communication Training
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christie Block
    Owner and Clinical Speech-Language Pathologist, New York Speech & Voice Lab, New York, NY
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Christie Block has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Christie Block has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Christie Block has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Christie Block has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Transgender / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 1
Article   |   February 27, 2017
Making a Case for Transmasculine Voice and Communication Training
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, February 2017, Vol. 2, 33-41. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG3.33
History: Received April 20, 2016 , Revised August 3, 2016 , Accepted August 3, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, February 2017, Vol. 2, 33-41. doi:10.1044/persp2.SIG3.33
History: Received April 20, 2016; Revised August 3, 2016; Accepted August 3, 2016

Transgender voice and communication training is an increasingly expanding service that is nevertheless not typically conducted for people who are seeking a more masculine presentation. It is commonly considered that testosterone administration, which many transmasculine people undergo to address gender dysphoria, lowers pitch sufficiently enough to not warrant training (Adler, Constansis, & Van Borsel, 2012; Van Borsel, DeCuypere, Rubens, & Destaerke, 2000). Transmasculine voice has been minimally researched (Azul, 2015; Azul, Nygren, Sodersten, & Neuschaefer-Rube, in press) and is often an afterthought in discussions about transgender voice. However, walk through the halls of the Philadelphia Trans* Health Conference, which typically has more than 3,000 attendees, many of whom are masculine-identified, and has hosted masculine voice workshops with over 70 participants, and you will witness the interest in transmasculine services. This article is based on lessons learned from conducting such workshops (Block, 2012; Block, 2013b) and providing training at New York Speech & Voice Lab within a diverse transgender community in New York City. I will argue that the need for transmasculine voice and communication services is more significant and complex than the predominant opinion suggests. I will discuss how to approach transmasculine training and increase the service so that interested individuals can get the help they deserve.

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