Vocabulary Selection in AAC: Application of Core Vocabulary in Atypical Populations On the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Community for Special Interest Group 12, Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), a community member introduced a discussion related to the selection and use of core vocabulary with students with severe intellectual or multiple disabilities. It was questioned whether or not core vocabulary determined in typically ... Article
Article  |   December 29, 2016
Vocabulary Selection in AAC: Application of Core Vocabulary in Atypical Populations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arjan van Tilborg
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Stijn R. J. M. Deckers
    School for Allied Health Professions, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, the Netherlands
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Arjan van Tilborg and Stijn R. J. M. Deckers have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Arjan van Tilborg and Stijn R. J. M. Deckers have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Arjan van Tilborg and Stijn R. J. M. Deckers have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Arjan van Tilborg and Stijn R. J. M. Deckers have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Part 4
Article   |   December 29, 2016
Vocabulary Selection in AAC: Application of Core Vocabulary in Atypical Populations
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 125-138. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG12.125
History: Received June 8, 2016 , Revised July 21, 2016 , Accepted August 21, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 125-138. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG12.125
History: Received June 8, 2016; Revised July 21, 2016; Accepted August 21, 2016

On the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Community for Special Interest Group 12, Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), a community member introduced a discussion related to the selection and use of core vocabulary with students with severe intellectual or multiple disabilities. It was questioned whether or not core vocabulary determined in typically developing children was applicable to AAC intervention in these students. The present article reviewed a vast amount of language sample studies related to core vocabulary in both typical and atypical populations. It was concluded that core vocabulary is comparable for both populations in various contexts, with various communication partners, over various topics, and in various modalities of language use. Core vocabulary is thus of high importance for all AAC users, regardless of physical or intellectual disabilities.

Acknowledgements
We would like to thank Gail van Tatenhove, Tracy Kovach, Debbie Witkowski, and Bruce Baker for their critical examination of our review study.
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