Student Misconceptions and Vocabulary Mix-ups: Speech Science at the Nexus Purpose The immediate purpose of this article is to describe how the meaning of terms used in the speech science classroom may conflict with different terminology used in ordinary conversation and in more specialized areas of practice. The ultimate aim is to enable teachers to head off these potential confusions ... Article
Article  |   December 15, 2016
Student Misconceptions and Vocabulary Mix-ups: Speech Science at the Nexus
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzanne Boyce
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Suzanne Boyce has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Suzanne Boyce has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: A portion of this manuscript was presented at a university forum.
    Nonfinancial: A portion of this manuscript was presented at a university forum.×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 1
Article   |   December 15, 2016
Student Misconceptions and Vocabulary Mix-ups: Speech Science at the Nexus
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 26-30. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG19.26
History: Received August 5, 2016 , Revised October 27, 2016 , Accepted October 27, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 26-30. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG19.26
History: Received August 5, 2016; Revised October 27, 2016; Accepted October 27, 2016

Purpose The immediate purpose of this article is to describe how the meaning of terms used in the speech science classroom may conflict with different terminology used in ordinary conversation and in more specialized areas of practice. The ultimate aim is to enable teachers to head off these potential confusions when teaching speech science, and to consider such confusions when untangling wrong answers from students.

Method Several examples of confusing terminology are discussed: Resonance, Constriction, Aspiration.

Conclusion Students and teachers have a hard job of disentangling the terminology used in the communication disorders classroom. Teachers should be aware of these potential confusions and take steps to reduce or elucidate them.

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