Editor's Column Teaching for diversity and social justice has always been challenging yet simultaneously, deeply rewarding and transformative for instructors and learners alike. We must acknowledge that this endeavor is relatively new to the fields of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Renowned experts in our discipline (Cheng, 1987; Taylor, 1986) committed to ... Editorial
Editorial  |   December 15, 2016
Editor's Column
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Part 3
Editorial   |   December 15, 2016
Editor's Column
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 88-89. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG14.88
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 88-89. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG14.88
Teaching for diversity and social justice has always been challenging yet simultaneously, deeply rewarding and transformative for instructors and learners alike. We must acknowledge that this endeavor is relatively new to the fields of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Renowned experts in our discipline (Cheng, 1987; Taylor, 1986) committed to multicultural instruction long before formal discussions began about inclusion of diversity issues in the curriculum. Yet, broadly speaking, social justice education still was a newly emerging field in the 1990s (Adams, Bell, & Griffin, 2007) and it was not until the late 1990s that more programs in communicative sciences and disorders began to offer elective or required courses in diversity issues pertinent to speech-language pathology and audiology. Currently, within academic programs, there are varying degrees of commitment and perceived need for curricula in diversity issues ranging from complete openness and innovation to frank resistance. It is common for academic and clinical faculty to regard diversity issues and related topics as elective content. Further, there is a strong conviction that this content is being infused in most classes, despite limited evidence for such infusion. Lastly, there often are concerns about the unwieldy nature of diversity issues, the breadth of potential topics, and learner reaction to taking additional required courses. Yet novice learners look to us as instructors, supervisors and mentors to define and uphold values of the profession, and it is these values that should guide our curricular planning and decision-making.
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