Maternal Postpartum Depression and Communication Development in Infants: Is There a Role for the Speech-Language Pathologist? Objective To survey speech-language pathologists (SLPs) regarding their involvement in treating infants whose mothers experience postpartum depression. Method SIG 1 members were invited to participate in an 8-question survey examining their involvement with infant-mother pairs, including mothers diagnosed with postpartum depression (PPD). Results Results indicate that, ... Article
Article  |   December 15, 2016
Maternal Postpartum Depression and Communication Development in Infants: Is There a Role for the Speech-Language Pathologist?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Hall
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Maine, Orono, ME
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures×
  • Financial: Nancy Hall has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Nancy Hall has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Nancy Hall has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Nancy Hall has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Development / Part 4
Article   |   December 15, 2016
Maternal Postpartum Depression and Communication Development in Infants: Is There a Role for the Speech-Language Pathologist?
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 175-181. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG1.175
History: Received July 12, 2016 , Revised August 12, 2016 , Accepted August 25, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 175-181. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG1.175
History: Received July 12, 2016; Revised August 12, 2016; Accepted August 25, 2016

Objective To survey speech-language pathologists (SLPs) regarding their involvement in treating infants whose mothers experience postpartum depression.

Method SIG 1 members were invited to participate in an 8-question survey examining their involvement with infant-mother pairs, including mothers diagnosed with postpartum depression (PPD).

Results Results indicate that, while some SLPs frequently work with infant-mother pairs, few have knowledge regarding the diagnosis of PPD in the mothers.

Conclusions It is likely that many SLPs are working with infant-mother pairs that include mothers who are experiencing PPD. Suggestions regarding the role of the SLP are offered, including providing support for these mothers in terms of obtaining services and helping these mothers use appropriate infant-directed speech to facilitate communication and cognitive development in their infants.

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