Interprofessional Care in the Management of Alzheimer's Dementia: Leaving Our Silos As speech-language pathologists (SLPs), we are poised to become leaders in the caring of adults with dementia; however, because of the complexity of this health condition, and its impact on patients and families, we must move beyond discipline-specific approaches to intervention and embrace the opportunities that arise when working across ... Article
Article  |   December 14, 2016
Interprofessional Care in the Management of Alzheimer's Dementia: Leaving Our Silos
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Natalie F. Douglas
    Department of Communication Disorders, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI
  • Katie McDonald
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, HealthSource Saginaw, Saginaw, MI
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Natalie F. Douglas has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Katie McDonald has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Natalie F. Douglas has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Katie McDonald has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Natalie F. Douglas has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Katie McDonald has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Natalie F. Douglas has no relevant financial interests to disclose. Katie McDonald has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Part 3
Article   |   December 14, 2016
Interprofessional Care in the Management of Alzheimer's Dementia: Leaving Our Silos
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 129-137. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.129
History: Received August 31, 2016 , Revised September 20, 2016 , Accepted September 25, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 129-137. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG2.129
History: Received August 31, 2016; Revised September 20, 2016; Accepted September 25, 2016

As speech-language pathologists (SLPs), we are poised to become leaders in the caring of adults with dementia; however, because of the complexity of this health condition, and its impact on patients and families, we must move beyond discipline-specific approaches to intervention and embrace the opportunities that arise when working across professional silos. The application of principles of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) can be applied to maximize Alzheimer's dementia care. In this paper, the organizational characteristics supporting IPP will be highlighted, an outline of applications of training procedures to promote IPP in a rehabilitation environment will be reviewed, and real-world case studies will be provided to highlight salient principles.

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