Building Collaborative Competencies for Speech Language Pathologists and Deaf Educators: Review of a Pilot Project Collaboration between professionals is widely recognized as best practice, although in serving students who are deaf/hard of hearing, deaf educators and speech-language pathologists often function in parallel roles rather than in cooperative partnerships. Interactions between graduate students in speech-language pathology and deaf education are explored during a pilot project in ... Article
Article  |   December 09, 2016
Building Collaborative Competencies for Speech Language Pathologists and Deaf Educators: Review of a Pilot Project
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah Wainscott
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Sarah Wainscott has no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Sarah Wainscott has no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Sarah Wainscott has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Sarah Wainscott has no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Part 2
Article   |   December 09, 2016
Building Collaborative Competencies for Speech Language Pathologists and Deaf Educators: Review of a Pilot Project
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 31-42. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG10.31
History: Received July 6, 2016 , Revised August 15, 2016 , Accepted August 16, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, December 2016, Vol. 1, 31-42. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG10.31
History: Received July 6, 2016; Revised August 15, 2016; Accepted August 16, 2016

Collaboration between professionals is widely recognized as best practice, although in serving students who are deaf/hard of hearing, deaf educators and speech-language pathologists often function in parallel roles rather than in cooperative partnerships. Interactions between graduate students in speech-language pathology and deaf education are explored during a pilot project in which students from separate programs engaged together in online learning activities and in practicum settings. Rather than previous works, which have primarily documented shared content between the disciplines, this project applies a transformative learning model to the development of competencies related specifically to the practice of collaborating. Archives of online live discussions, student discussion boards, interviews with students, videos from shared clinic sessions, and supervisor notes were used to classify areas of student growth. Positive changes were documented in professional disposition as related to the other discipline, confidence in negotiating “role sharing” and “role release” with colleagues, skills in managing multiple tasks and objectives, and broadened skill sets related to the other discipline.

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