Laryngeal Movement Disorders and Their Management This review describes the current information related to laryngeal neuropathic disorders and the possible management options available. Voice changes may range from severe hoarseness due to choking and coughing to a mild intermittent dysphonia possibly accompanied by unusual breathing. Neither the sound of the voice nor the lack of hoarseness ... Article
Article  |   November 14, 2016
Laryngeal Movement Disorders and Their Management
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas Murry
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Loma Linda University Voice and Swallowing Center, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
  • Claudio F. Milstein
    Learner School of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, The Voice Center, Cleveland Clinic, Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: Thomas Murry and Claudio F. Milstein have no relevant financial interests to disclose.
    Financial: Thomas Murry and Claudio F. Milstein have no relevant financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: This paper is based on the presentation of Thomas Murry and Claudio F. Milstein at the 2015 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
    Nonfinancial: This paper is based on the presentation of Thomas Murry and Claudio F. Milstein at the 2015 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Part 3
Article   |   November 14, 2016
Laryngeal Movement Disorders and Their Management
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, November 2016, Vol. 1, 75-82. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG3.75
History: Received July 21, 2016 , Revised August 22, 2016 , Accepted August 22, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, November 2016, Vol. 1, 75-82. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG3.75
History: Received July 21, 2016; Revised August 22, 2016; Accepted August 22, 2016

This review describes the current information related to laryngeal neuropathic disorders and the possible management options available. Voice changes may range from severe hoarseness due to choking and coughing to a mild intermittent dysphonia possibly accompanied by unusual breathing. Neither the sound of the voice nor the lack of hoarseness should suggest that the problem itself is a minor one. Laryngeal neuropathic disorders may be the outcome of inflammation, irritation, infection, or a combination of these that causes a disruption in normal sensation. When sensory mediators no longer function normally, breathing, phonation, and even swallowing changes may be affected. Clinicians must be aware of the numerous sensory related disorders in the upper airway and currently accepted methods of treatment.

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