Overcoming Barriers to Using Telehealth for Standardized Language Assessments The clinical imperative to provide speech-language pathology services to families outside of the metropolitan area, while accounting for the barriers previously identified, was the impetus for a recent study conducted examining the use of telehealth in Australia (Sutherland et al., 2016). That study found that delivering standardized language assessments via ... Article
Article  |   September 30, 2016
Overcoming Barriers to Using Telehealth for Standardized Language Assessments
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca Sutherland
    The Children's Hospital at Westmead - Child Development Unit, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt. Gravatt, Queensland, Australia
  • Antoinette Hodge
    The Children's Hospital at Westmead - Child Development Unit, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
  • David Trembath
    Menzies Health Institute, Queensland, Australia
  • Suzi Drevensek
    The Children's Hospital at Westmead - Child Development Unit, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jacqueline Roberts
    Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University, Mt. Gravatt, Queensland, Australia
  • Disclosures
    Disclosures ×
  • Financial: This work was supported by the NSW Department of Education. National ICT Australia (NICTA) provided in-kind support in the form of the design of the assessment website interface.
    Financial: This work was supported by the NSW Department of Education. National ICT Australia (NICTA) provided in-kind support in the form of the design of the assessment website interface.×
  • Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: The authors have no relevant nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Part 2
Article   |   September 30, 2016
Overcoming Barriers to Using Telehealth for Standardized Language Assessments
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2016, Vol. 1, 41-50. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG18.41
History: Received April 30, 2016 , Revised August 4, 2016 , Accepted August 11, 2016
Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, September 2016, Vol. 1, 41-50. doi:10.1044/persp1.SIG18.41
History: Received April 30, 2016; Revised August 4, 2016; Accepted August 11, 2016

The clinical imperative to provide speech-language pathology services to families outside of the metropolitan area, while accounting for the barriers previously identified, was the impetus for a recent study conducted examining the use of telehealth in Australia (Sutherland et al., 2016). That study found that delivering standardized language assessments via telehealth using consumer grade equipment was feasible, reliable, and tolerated by students with language impairment. In the present article, a follow-up to Sutherland et al. (2016), the barriers to using telehealth are described, along with the steps taken to overcome these barriers in completing the original study. The current article also seeks to describe to the responses of the school-aged students and clinicians involved.

Acknowledgements
The authors wish to acknowledge Dr. Silvia Pfeiffer, Dr. Terence Percival, and Rosemary Hollowell of the National ICT Australia (NICTA, now known as Data61); Sabrena Lee, Marcia Williamsz, Kate Baggett, Fiona Eastley, Chantelle Medley, Sylvia Pope, Jenny Rayner, and Neale Waddy of The NSW Centre for Effective Reading, NSW Department of Education; and Associate Professor Natalie Silove and The Child Development Unit, The Children's Hospital at Westmead.
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